Monsanto and our wheat supply

Do you ever find it strange that so many people in the past few years have developed a gluten/wheat intolerance? I can’t help but think back to my childhood, teen years and even 20’s and 30’s, when hardly anybody had an allergy to anything. I don’t even remember hearing the word allergy when I was in school. Granted it was a small, country school, but still. It feels like every other person I chat with today has a sensitivity/allergy/intolerance to something in their diet, or leaky gut, IBS or another illness of the digestive tract. All of this has made me wonder just what is going on in with our health these days. Then I stumbled on an article last week that could explain the problems and issues and ill health that so many of us are currently experiencing. The topic of the article was Glyphosate.

What is glyphosate? It’s a poisonous weed killer that conventional grain crops are now sprayed with a few days before harvest time. In fact 95% of farms in Canada’s prairies are spraying this GMO Monsanto poison…oops, I mean product on their crops.

Why is it sprayed on crops? Because it kills the crops and they dry out and die, making harvesting them easier, faster and more profitable for the farmer. The only problem is that the glyphosate residue is all over the grain and stays there until we eat it. Now I’m not a scientist but, considering how much grain we eat, we are probably being dosed with a Monsanto pesticide almost every day of our lives. Not good. Not good and not natural and a probable explanation for all of the health problems mentioned in the second paragraph.

What crops are sprayed with glyphosate? Here’s a list of conventional crops (organic are okay) to avoid. All of these crops are currently heavily dosed with glyphosate:

  • Lentils
  • Corn
  • Wheat
  • Soybeans
  • Millet
  • Flax
  • Rye and buckwheat
  • Canola
  • Peas

I don’t know about you, but I find that a very depressing list. Not only are some of my favourite foods on the list, but some of the items on the list are in almost all packaged food, meaning this Monsanto pesticide is heavily embedded in our food supply.

When glyphosate is ingested it upsets the all important balance of good bacteria in our gut, probably contributing to a host of health issues and may compromise our immune system as well. 

What can we do to get glyphosate out of our diet?

  • Make sure to only buy organic when it comes the list sprayed crops.
  • Buy local as much as possible as small, organic farms don’t use Monsanto products.
  • Eat rice instead of wheat or rye
  • Don’t use canola oil in cooking or as salad dressing
  • Don’t eat soybeans as all are pretty much GMO or sprayed now-a-days
  • Email this address and tell them that it’s not okay how Monsanto is affecting our food supply

When you’re searching for safe grain products, avoid conventional agriculture and packaged food with suspect ingredients.

 It make take a little effort but your health is so worth it.

Flowers in the Rain

I took an extra day off last weekend to squeeze in as much beach time as possible before summer fades into a distant memory. And, guess what? The weather report lied. It had shown a sky full of a happy, smiling, bright yellow sunshine and what the weather gods delivered was a misty, grey Vancouver day accompanied by the gentle pitter patter of mellow but constant raindrops.

So, after taking some time to be annoyed at not being able to spend my day strolling on the seawall, I took Nick for a walk in the neighborhood and found this…

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My neighbor’s zucchini garden. The bright, sunshine-y flowers were almost shocking against the muted greys and greens of the rest of my world. My neighbor had already told me to help myself to his garden, so I obliged.

Pan-fried zucchini florets are one of my favourite things and they are so easy to prepare:

Fresh Zucchini Florets with Blue Cheese

  • Pour a couple of tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil into a frying pan
  • add as many florets as you have or will fit into the pan
  • fry until soft
  • add crumbled blue cheese at the very end (local, organic is always best)
  • put on a pretty plate and serve

One word of warning: When you start growing your own food and/or foraging, bugs often make an unwanted appearance. Unlike conventional food which is radiated, gmo and/or sprayed to within an inch of it’s life with pesticides, real food is a yummy home for a number of insects. After I thoroughly washed the outside of my florets, I put them in the pan and, guess what? Two slugs quickly appeared and ran around, as if to say “Why is it getting hot in here? What the heck is going on?” I grabbed a piece of paper and guided them out of the frying pan and into a pot in my balcony garden, screaming periodically whenever they crawled towards my hand.

Anyway, this can happen with fresh, organic food so be prepared. I think it’s a small price to pay for the exquisite, just picked taste and health benefits of real, unaltered, honest to goodness food.

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Gillian Aldrich started growing vegetables in her backyard three years ago, and she’s now working on planting a bed of hydrangeas along one side of her property. As she digs in the garden, her 8-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son often play around her, sometimes taking a break to dig for worms or pick strawberries. Instead of watching them, Aldrich is playing, too — “my kind of play,” she says.

“When you sit at a desk all day, there’s something about literally putting your hands in the dirt, digging and actually creating something that’s really beautiful,” says Aldrich, 42, a magazine editor in Maplewood, New Jersey. “There’s something about just being out there that feels kind of elemental.”

Aldrich isn’t the only one who feels this way. Many gardeners view their hobby as the perfect antidote to the modern world, a way of reclaiming some of the intangible things we’ve lost in our busy, dirt-free lives. – Health.com